They Made Me Do It….!

…but I was very happy to conform!
When a revered Edinburgh College asked me to produce a painting relevant to their own Great War remembrances, we decided on the Bristol F2b.
The Bristol Fighter incidentally was always known to its crews as the “Biff” and not by the subsequent and baleful, press-led soubriquet of “Bristfit”.
Amongst the college’s former pupils were the three brothers Barnwell. Of those, one went to the Army but the other two, Harold and Frank were aeronautically inclined. Harold became a test-pilot for Vickers and would die in a crash in 1918.
Frank however became a designer at Bristol and would be partly responsible for the Scout shown below. This was a real pilots’ aeroplane and well-beloved by all.

Scout

Scout

After the Scout, Frank designed the M1 monoplane, an extremely efficient fighter but destined to be un-acceptable to the biased anti-monoplane thinking of the top brass.
Frank’s next design – the Bristol Fighter – was probably the finest all-rounder produced by any of the warring nations and destined to fly on almost all fronts, surviving in the RAF until 1930.

Looking to be a wee bit different I’ve pictured this one over the deserts of Palestine. A No.1 Squadron Australian Flying Corps “Biff” about to engage a Rumpler CIV in 1918.

Biff

Biff

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WIP! Work in Progress.

My Media-adviser (Ruthie) assures me I have to have a THEME for successful blogging. That’s a shame as I thought I’d try to cover Aeroplanes, Steam Locomotives, the Caledonian and Highland Railways, Bicycles and cycling, Running, Music, perhaps Photography and Colour theory. Artists materials, Running shoes, Saxophones, BSA Gold Stars, First World War history and maybe more.
Oh well – I shall be on Aero-Painting then. With occasional deviations.
There’s an Edinburgh school which has an impressive list of former pupils – amongst whom were the Barnwell Brothers. Harold became a test-pilot for Vickers but died in a crash in 1918. Frank however was a designer with Bristol and produced the Great War’s Bristol Scout, M1 Monoplane, Bristol Fighter and then went on to create the Blenheim prototype between the wars.
That very school now requires an image for a 2014 WW1 Centenary publication and it’s to be the Bristol Fighter (or “Biff” to its crews.)
I thought I’d try one in a more unusual but still authentic setting. Having a tussle with a Rumpler CIV in Palestine regions.
From No.1 Squadron Australian Flying Corps. The fuselage is overpainted in white, either for recognition or for easier spotting on the ground in case of engine-failure

Biff

Biff

A fair bit to go yet but I WILL try not to over-work this one.